Lecture programme 2014-15

Meetings are held in the Riverside Room in the Angel Centre, Tonbridge, usually on the second Thursday of the month. Non-members are welcome to attend as guests at a fee of £3 (under 18s free), payable at the door.

Thursday 18th September 2014, 7.45 pm

Traditional Kentish Building Materials – Richard Filmer
Kent is rich in providing suitable building materials for traditional building construction. The rather complex geology of the area has, over the years, yielded a rich variety of building stones, fine clays for brick and tile making together, of course, with oak and other woods. The illustrated presentation examines, through vernacular architecture, the part that our traditional materials have played in creating the texture of the landscape of the area.

Thursday, 9th October 2014, 7.45 pm

Tonbridge Castle’s Great Gatehouse – the architecture reassessed – David Martin
Our speaker is a retired archaeological researcher at University College Lon­don, where he currently holds an honorary position as a research fellow. He is Past President of The Vernacular Architecture Group and an active researcher into the timber-framed buildings of the South-East of England, particularly East Sussex, for which he was made a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries.

Saturday, 8th November 2014, 2.30 pm

This is a two-session meeting with an interval for tea. Advance booking is required.

Talk 1: Archaeology at Knole – Nathalie Cohen
We will hear about the results of two years of archaeological investigation of the building complex and landscape at Knole, and the future work to take place as part of the National Trust’s major Heritage Lottery Funded conservation project at the property. The speaker, Nathalie Cohen, works part-time for both the Thames Discovery Programme at Museum of London Archaeology, and the National Trust as Regional Archaeologist for Kent & East Sussex.

Talk 2: Graffiti at Knole: the hidden history – Matthew Champion
This talk will present the findings from an on-going project studying the graffiti at Knole, and the hidden history of the house that it is gradually bringing to life. The speaker is a historian/archaeologist, Project Director of the Norfolk Medieval Graffiti Survey, a volunteer-led com­munity archaeology project that aims to undertake the first large scale systematic survey of medieval graffiti in the UK.

Thursday, 11th December 2014, 7.45 pm

The Story of the London Eye – Bob Appleton
The talk will tell the story behind the Millennium Wheel, now the London Eye, along with an introduction to ‘Big Wheels’ (Ferris Wheels) from the 19th century, such as those in Chicago, Paris, Vienna and the first ‘Big Wheel’ in London at Earls Court.

Thursday 12th February 2015, 7.45pm

Artists of the First World War – the Triumph of the Avant-Garde – Martin Heard
The speaker is an independent art historian who, since retiring from information technology both in contin­ental Europe and North America, has devoted his time to researching Art Historical periods and subjects that have garnered his interest over the years. In this talk he shows how early twentieth century modernist artists responded in visual terms to the challenges of the Great War.

Thursday, 12th March 2015, 7.45 pm

The Early Kingdoms of Kent, 100BC to 600AD – Deborah Cole 
Kent was the first recorded English kingdom which some say swallowed up the previously independent West Kent. In the very colourful and controversial history from 100BC to 600AD what can be told about war lord and tribe becoming king and state? Deborah is a THS Committee Member who has a PhD in medieval archaeology and recently published a book ‘The Tonbridge Circular Walk – in the footsteps of mediaeval knights’. She also leads WEA courses on early Kentish history and Kentish places.
 

Thursday, 16th April 2015, 7.30pm

Annual General Meeting, followed by

Gluttony and Starvation in the 19th Century – Jules Dussek
Gruel, bread, soup, a little cheese and hardly any meat was the starving labourer’s diet. More shocking than this was the diet of the workhouse and prison. The speaker is a retired surgeon, with a passion for food which he has been able to indulge whilst cruising the canals of France.

Date/Time
Thursday, 14th December, 2017
7:45 pm

Location
Angel Centre
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Lecture programme 2014-15

Meetings are held in the Riverside Room in the Angel Centre, Tonbridge, usually on the second Thursday of the month. Non-members are welcome to attend as guests at a fee of £3 (under 18s free), payable at the door.

Thursday 18th September 2014, 7.45 pm

Traditional Kentish Building Materials – Richard Filmer
Kent is rich in providing suitable building materials for traditional building construction. The rather complex geology of the area has, over the years, yielded a rich variety of building stones, fine clays for brick and tile making together, of course, with oak and other woods. The illustrated presentation examines, through vernacular architecture, the part that our traditional materials have played in creating the texture of the landscape of the area.

Thursday, 9th October 2014, 7.45 pm

Tonbridge Castle’s Great Gatehouse – the architecture reassessed – David Martin
Our speaker is a retired archaeological researcher at University College Lon­don, where he currently holds an honorary position as a research fellow. He is Past President of The Vernacular Architecture Group and an active researcher into the timber-framed buildings of the South-East of England, particularly East Sussex, for which he was made a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries.

Saturday, 8th November 2014, 2.30 pm

This is a two-session meeting with an interval for tea. Advance booking is required.

Talk 1: Archaeology at Knole – Nathalie Cohen
We will hear about the results of two years of archaeological investigation of the building complex and landscape at Knole, and the future work to take place as part of the National Trust’s major Heritage Lottery Funded conservation project at the property. The speaker, Nathalie Cohen, works part-time for both the Thames Discovery Programme at Museum of London Archaeology, and the National Trust as Regional Archaeologist for Kent & East Sussex.

Talk 2: Graffiti at Knole: the hidden history – Matthew Champion
This talk will present the findings from an on-going project studying the graffiti at Knole, and the hidden history of the house that it is gradually bringing to life. The speaker is a historian/archaeologist, Project Director of the Norfolk Medieval Graffiti Survey, a volunteer-led com­munity archaeology project that aims to undertake the first large scale systematic survey of medieval graffiti in the UK.

Thursday, 11th December 2014, 7.45 pm

The Story of the London Eye – Bob Appleton
The talk will tell the story behind the Millennium Wheel, now the London Eye, along with an introduction to ‘Big Wheels’ (Ferris Wheels) from the 19th century, such as those in Chicago, Paris, Vienna and the first ‘Big Wheel’ in London at Earls Court.

Thursday 12th February 2015, 7.45pm

Artists of the First World War – the Triumph of the Avant-Garde – Martin Heard
The speaker is an independent art historian who, since retiring from information technology both in contin­ental Europe and North America, has devoted his time to researching Art Historical periods and subjects that have garnered his interest over the years. In this talk he shows how early twentieth century modernist artists responded in visual terms to the challenges of the Great War.

Thursday, 12th March 2015, 7.45 pm

The Early Kingdoms of Kent, 100BC to 600AD – Deborah Cole 
Kent was the first recorded English kingdom which some say swallowed up the previously independent West Kent. In the very colourful and controversial history from 100BC to 600AD what can be told about war lord and tribe becoming king and state? Deborah is a THS Committee Member who has a PhD in medieval archaeology and recently published a book ‘The Tonbridge Circular Walk – in the footsteps of mediaeval knights’. She also leads WEA courses on early Kentish history and Kentish places.
 

Thursday, 16th April 2015, 7.30pm

Annual General Meeting, followed by

Gluttony and Starvation in the 19th Century – Jules Dussek
Gruel, bread, soup, a little cheese and hardly any meat was the starving labourer’s diet. More shocking than this was the diet of the workhouse and prison. The speaker is a retired surgeon, with a passion for food which he has been able to indulge whilst cruising the canals of France.

Date/Time
Thursday, 14th December, 2017
7:45 pm

Location
Angel Centre
Loading Map....
Add to google calendar 0